Grainline Scout Tee x Complex Geometries

Grainline Scout // sewstlist.wordpress.com // pic3

One of my sewing goals over the last year or so has been to start working with some of the same patterns more than once. Don’t get me wrong, I love the thrill of the new just as much as the next person. But some of my least favorite steps in the sewing process are the fitting/muslin making steps, and one way to avoid those less thrilling steps is to use a pattern I’m already familiar with. Sunni has written about the power of building a collection of basic patterns that you can alter and remix to create a new look, and Gertie’s New Book for Better Sewing was also written with this approach in mind.

Grainline Scout // sewstlist.wordpress.com // pic1

For this top I started with the well-known, well-loved Grainline Scout Tee, then altered the pattern to make it look more like this tee by Complex Geometries.

Complex Geometries Orbit Tee // sewstylist.wordpress.com

image via totokaelo.com

When I originally spotted this piece on my favorite (for gawking more than shopping) online boutique, Totokaelo, I fell immediately and completely in love with it, but it was, alas, sold out. Sewing skills to the rescue!

Grainline Scout // sewstylist.wordpress.com // pic8

To get this look I used Jen’s tutorial to lengthen the sleeves. I also lengthened the front of the shirt by about five inches, lengthened the back of the shirt by about a foot at center back then tapered it up to meet the front at the sides. And of course I added a TON of fullness, which is really what makes this shirt so fun.

Grainline Scout // sewstylist.wordpress.com // pic10

I made my shirt out of a cotton blend jersey. Several other sewicialists have made up Scout in jersey without altering a thing. Janice of She’s in Fashion posted an example of how awesome a knit Scout can look just last week. I’m not sure what she did to finish her neckline, but I opted to use the finishing technique I learned from Heather’s Nettie pattern instructions. The sleeves and bottom hem are simply turned up and finished with a double needle. For those of you who don’t have or are otherwise averse to using a serger, this is an example of a knit jersey project that was constructed entirely on a sewing machine. Yep, it totally works out fine.

Grainline Scout // sewstlist.wordpress.com // pic4

This shirt has been getting so much play since I made it a month or so ago. It’s just as comfortable as any old tee, but the added drama of the fullness and funky hemline mean it’s way, waaay more fun to wear.

Grainline Scout // sewstlist.wordpress.com // pic6

On the subject of comfort, I’m not really one for wearing leggings as pants, despite how deliciously comfortable they can be, because city girls have to be conscientious about just how much body we’re trying to expose to unwanted attention, if ya know what I mean. This shirt pairs perfectly with leggings because the butt is fully covered but the legs still show up front, which is exactly how we want it.

Grainline Scout // sewstlist.wordpress.com // pic5

Given my little success with this Scout alteration I’m super inspired to keep working with this pattern to see what else it can do! Have you experimented much with pattern alterations? What patterns do you find yourself returning to?

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43 thoughts on “Grainline Scout Tee x Complex Geometries

  1. What a great silhouette. I tend to repeat patterns a lot if I like them, because as you say, muslins suck! Also you are rocking the tights with pants! Totally with you on the butt coverage factor.

    • I know, I’m really trying to learn to love the process of making a muslin, but seriously, the whole time I’m doing it there’s a little voice in my head saying, “When do we get to the good part?!” Haha.

  2. I am a scout tee fan as well, I have made already out of it a dress, a tunic, a t-shirt. It is so comfy and with few alterations you can have a really dramatic effect. I love your result!!!! How did you add fullness? When I did a dress I used box pleats.

  3. This is f*cking stupendous and I want 5 just like it. I also love high low hems for the ability to make tights into pants, haha.

  4. LOVE THIS!!! Please share how you added fullness to the pattern. I’m a bit large for Grainline unfortunately but I have mucho other t-shirt patterns to hack (did I mention how much I LOVE THIS!).

    • Awesome, Tiffany, so glad you like it. And yeah, I can definitely put a post together showing how I slashed and spread this look together. Stay tuned! 🙂

  5. I was looking for a way to modify the Scout pattern with knit fabric, and I found your blog. I LOVE this. Great job! I try to modify all my patterns to be made with knits, because for some reason I struggle with sewing any other kind of fabric.

    • Thanks, Meg! You know, it’s funny, I was just talking to a fellow sewing nerd the other day about how afraid some people are afraid of sewing knits. She was saying that knits are pretty much all she sews, and that wovens are what makes her nervous. Just goes to show you never can tell! That said, I think you can make up the Scout in knit without making any mods at all. Good luck!

  6. I agree that having a selection of well fitting patterns that you can pull out over and over again is a great idea. Especially when you can pull a look like this out of the bag. Absolutely stunning, and it looks very high end!

  7. This is fantastic! I came here via the rabbit hole of clicking on blog links and I’m so glad I did. I have been playing around with a similar silhouette. I made a few tees based on the idea of a circle (like a circle skirt). But this is so much better than what I’ve done. I want one! So incredibly chic.

  8. I could not love this more! I have been dying to do this with the tiny pocket tank!! I think you’ve pushed me to finally go for it!

  9. love this!!! i’m going to have to make one… i’m thinking it would be awesome as a dress too because it’s about to hit 100 where i live so i’ll be in dresses until september.

  10. This is so super cool and a perfect replica of the inspiration image. I’ve got an ikat baby doll dress planned using the Scout tee as a base, so simple. Love this pattern!!

  11. Pingback: tutorial // scout tee x complex geometries | SewStylist

  12. I have literally no sewing skills and have been scouting the web for the orbit tee for close to two years now. Do you by any chance make custom orders for other people? Your version is so perfect – I love it!

    • Hi, Maggie, and thank you! That’s an interesting proposition… Why don’t you email me and we’ll see if we can work something out. Futurette at yahoo dot com.

  13. looks awesome! I need to try this myself. I found your mention of my blog by accident when I was researching Scout variations lol. thanks for the mention!

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