Sound & Vision: Summertime Rolls

July Mood Board_5_sewstylist.wordpress.comJuly Mood Board_3_sewstylist.wordpress.com

California is synonymous with summertime. Ironically, my section of the state doesn’t get much in the way of a summer season. (Though, as I’ve written about earlier, this year has been uniquely lovely.) Never mind the weather, this time of year I’m thinking about slowing down, warming up, swimming, sandals, picnics, road trips, bonfires, getting lost, finding something new, and making out under the moonlight. This month’s mood board and music explore what all that looks and feels like for me. And what about you? What does summertime inspire you to do?

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[image credits: one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine: unknown, ten, eleven, twelve: “My mission in life is not merely to survive, but to thrive, and to do so with some passion, some compassion, some humor, and some style.-M. Angelou, thirteen, fourteen, fifteen, sixteen, seventeen, eighteen, nineteen: unknown, twenty: a still from Suddenly Last Summer]

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Grainline Scout Tee x Complex Geometries

Grainline Scout // sewstlist.wordpress.com // pic3

One of my sewing goals over the last year or so has been to start working with some of the same patterns more than once. Don’t get me wrong, I love the thrill of the new just as much as the next person. But some of my least favorite steps in the sewing process are the fitting/muslin making steps, and one way to avoid those less thrilling steps is to use a pattern I’m already familiar with. Sunni has written about the power of building a collection of basic patterns that you can alter and remix to create a new look, and Gertie’s New Book for Better Sewing was also written with this approach in mind.

Grainline Scout // sewstlist.wordpress.com // pic1

For this top I started with the well-known, well-loved Grainline Scout Tee, then altered the pattern to make it look more like this tee by Complex Geometries.

Complex Geometries Orbit Tee // sewstylist.wordpress.com

image via totokaelo.com

When I originally spotted this piece on my favorite (for gawking more than shopping) online boutique, Totokaelo, I fell immediately and completely in love with it, but it was, alas, sold out. Sewing skills to the rescue!

Grainline Scout // sewstylist.wordpress.com // pic8

To get this look I used Jen’s tutorial to lengthen the sleeves. I also lengthened the front of the shirt by about five inches, lengthened the back of the shirt by about a foot at center back then tapered it up to meet the front at the sides. And of course I added a TON of fullness, which is really what makes this shirt so fun.

Grainline Scout // sewstylist.wordpress.com // pic10

I made my shirt out of a cotton blend jersey. Several other sewicialists have made up Scout in jersey without altering a thing. Janice of She’s in Fashion posted an example of how awesome a knit Scout can look just last week. I’m not sure what she did to finish her neckline, but I opted to use the finishing technique I learned from Heather’s Nettie pattern instructions. The sleeves and bottom hem are simply turned up and finished with a double needle. For those of you who don’t have or are otherwise averse to using a serger, this is an example of a knit jersey project that was constructed entirely on a sewing machine. Yep, it totally works out fine.

Grainline Scout // sewstlist.wordpress.com // pic4

This shirt has been getting so much play since I made it a month or so ago. It’s just as comfortable as any old tee, but the added drama of the fullness and funky hemline mean it’s way, waaay more fun to wear.

Grainline Scout // sewstlist.wordpress.com // pic6

On the subject of comfort, I’m not really one for wearing leggings as pants, despite how deliciously comfortable they can be, because city girls have to be conscientious about just how much body we’re trying to expose to unwanted attention, if ya know what I mean. This shirt pairs perfectly with leggings because the butt is fully covered but the legs still show up front, which is exactly how we want it.

Grainline Scout // sewstlist.wordpress.com // pic5

Given my little success with this Scout alteration I’m super inspired to keep working with this pattern to see what else it can do! Have you experimented much with pattern alterations? What patterns do you find yourself returning to?

tutorial // fabric covered buttons

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fabric covered buttons added a nice, high-quality touch to my simple sundress

One of the best things about sewing your own clothes is having the opportunity to add the special details that make a garment uniquely yours. Fabric covered buttons are a simple, easy way to add interest and detail to your garment. Covering your buttons is a great way to upgrade less than stellar buttons from your stash or to save yourself the work of hunting high and low for the perfect match to your project. This method for covering buttons is easier, less expensive, and more delicate than most of the covered button kits on the market.

let's get these naked little buttons covered!

let’s get these naked little buttons covered!

What you’ll need:

  • Find yourself some buttons with two or four holes, not shanked.
  • The best fabric for this application will be weighty enough to withstand some manipulation and tugging but lightweight enough to wrap snuggly around the button, and it won’t easily fray. Here, I used a linen blend. You won’t need more than a tiny scrap of fabric.
  • You’ll also need a needle, thread to match your covering fabric, scissors, and some fray check.

fabric covered button turorial.cutting fabric rounds collage

How to:

  • Trace and cut a round of fabric that’s about twice the circumference of your button. Here I used a quarter as a template for my 1/2 inch button.
  • Leaving about 1/8 inch seam allowance, sew a running stitch around the edge of the fabric round. You might want to secure your thread with a backstitch as you begin; a knot alone may not be secure enough to hold.

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  • Don’t knot off your thread once you’ve stitched all the way around. Instead, start tugging the thread and gather the round into a cupped shape. I used the tip of my thumb to begin easing the fabric into position. (Try to keep your needled threaded during this step.)
  • As the fabric begins to cup, drop your button in (see below). If your button has a front and back, place the button with the front facing down against the fabric. Use your finger to keep it centered as you pull the thread, tightening the fabric around your button.

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  • Take a few stitches around the little folds of fabric at the back of your button, reinforcing the gathers you just made.
  • I also like to pass the thread beneath the entire mound of folds once or twice before knotting off.

fabric covered button tutorial.stitch the folds

  • Knot and trim your thread. You may also want to trim down the fabric gathered at the back of your button. It’s cool to trim off any stray threads, but be careful not to snip through the securing stitches you’ve just made.
  • Drop a little fray check over the whole business for extra security. Buttons can take a lot of wear and handling over the lifetime of a garment, and this helps ensure our covers are secure enough to last.
  • That’s it! Look at that sweet little button!

fabric covered button tutorial.fray check

  • When attaching your buttons, check with a needle first to find out where your buttonholes are. I like to wiggle my needle around to open up the weave a bit and clearly mark the openings.
  • I used 3 plys of embroidery thread to attach my buttons. I made two passes through the fabric + button, then I wrapped the thread twice to make a shank before knotting off.

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  • I took the simple route and used self fabric for my buttons, but think of all the fun ways you could use this application! It could be cute to use a bit of your lining fabric to make a co-ordinated button. You could also use the wrong side of your self fabric to create a similar but different look for your buttons. Or imagine if you used a vintage silk scarf or repurposed the fabric from a stylish old tie?
  • It might also be a nice touch to tack your buttons down with French knots, instead of just a simple strand of thread.
  • Finally, you might want to make a spare button or two while you’re at it. It would be sad if, sometime in the future, you lost one of your couture buttons and no longer had access to the fabric you used to cover it.

fabric covered button tutorial.finished button!

I hope you’ve found this helpful, and please do let me know in the comments if you have any questions!

So, what do you think? Do these covered buttons look like something you might try on an upcoming project?

my ideal dress

my ideal dress//sewstylist.wordpress.com

It’s been a strange year in San Francisco. The glorious, warm, summery weather we typically expect to get no more than 2-3 weeks of down here Has Not Quit. Did I mention it’s been glorious? Glorious! Okay, I’ll calm down. But seriously, my closet was not prepared for all this (glorious!) sunshine. The heat would strike and I’d feel the need for a comfortable, easy to wear dress that was as feminine as it was sexy. Was I thinking I’d find the answer to my sartorial dreams in a vintage patten with a cover art model that looks like an extra out of a John Hughes film? Hmmm, nope. Can’t say that I was. Bad cover art be damned; when you make this dress up in something less visually arresting than peach+blue+yellow+plaid it kinda starts looking like a garment that would be equally at home on Audrey Hepburn or Bridgette Bardot. Right?

my ideal dress//sewstylist.wordpress.com

I came by Simplicity 7506 (circa 1986) when a member of my most excellent local sewing club brought a huge box of vintage patterns to giveaway at our last meet-up. I did have a moment of worrying over getting greedy around the free-vintage-pattern-awesomeness; fortunately the moment was brief. I’m not sure I realized when I nabbed this pattern that it was my dream dress. But The more I considered the elements of this dress—the full tea-length skirt, the princess seamed bodice, the button front, the pockets!—the more I started to feel the need to push all other sewing plans aside and proceed with making up this dress pronto. Friends, I’m so glad I did, because today was another glorious San Francisco summer day!

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The lovely fullness of this skirt made it easy to chill at the park without worrying about showing my lady bits, and since I made it up in an easy wearing grey/black linen blend (that has been languishing in my stash for at least a year) I could be totally casual about sitting on the lawn, noshing on a sandwich. This turned out to be the perfect fabric choice for this dress. The linen has the body to hold up the fitted bodice, but still enough easy, breezy goodness to hang loose at the skirt.

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I lined the bodice with a light weight rayon twill I had leftover from another project. This not only feels great against my skin, it also provides the opaqueness I needed up top. In other finishing news, I pinked all the seams because I really love the vintage look this gives and also because it’s a light weight, flexible way to finish a seam, which made it a good treatment for this light, flowing skirt.

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I used my rolled hem foot to finish the hem. Now I’ve gotta tell you, I’ve never had a rolled hem turn out this good! I’m not sure if the difference was me or the fabric… I’m thinking it was the fabric as usually I try to use that foot on silk, and the whole endeavor makes me want to cry. Things went so well this time I’m inspired to try using that little foot more often.

14454481452_45bd3fed74_oSpeaking of developing new skills, this dress marks the first time I’ve made spaghetti straps and that’s also my first button placket! I used Jen @ Grainline Studio’s method for turning the straps, as witnessed on her Instagram feed. Getting those suckers started was tough going, but once you’ve got that first inch or so turned the rest is a breeze. As for the button placket, I stuck pretty closely to the pattern instructions. Only change was stitching in the ditch to get the backside tacked down instead of doing that by hand. I did tack the lining down by hand, but it seemed like the placket should be as sturdy as possible. It came out looking clean, so I’m happy.
14269545089_7aa4c36469_oYou can also see in this pic that I made my own fabric covered buttons to match the dress. I got a bag of about a hundred little buttons at the thrift store, and covering them was a good way to uh, raise their profile a bit. They were fun to make and add a special, handcrafted touch to the dress, I think. Once I had the dress on I saw that buttons alone do not a fully closed dress make… Er, which is to say there was some major gappage happening in the in-between areas. If I make this dress again (and right now I’m thinking there’s a good chance I will do) I’ll probably add just a wee bit more ease into the bodice, which may or may not help with the gappage. But for this round I added the hook + bars you see above & problem solved!

14454456372_5864789c92_oYou know how sometimes you try on something you made for the first time and can’t help but let out a little squeal of joy? This was totally one of those times. I’m in love with this dress, you guys! My closet finally has the perfect dress for strolling, park sitting, barbecuing and cocktail sipping so long as SF wants to keep all this glorious weather coming!

sound & vision: june mood

I’m back this month with another music mix. Because the music is all about capturing a mood, I figured I’d start including a mini mood board with these posts to ground some of what I’m thinking about and feeling in sound & vision. I really have fun putting these posts together and hope you enjoy it too! And for those of you who primarily stop by this blog for sewing related news, fret not! I’ll be back in a day or a few to post some of what I’ve been up to.

JuneMoodBoard

photo credits: wolf rules, loners, black suede boots, black swansdramatic neutrals,

gold tip & half moon manicure (from tadashi shoji, fall 2014)